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How to Reduce Your Risk of Osteoporosis

About 10 million Americans have osteoporosis, a condition that causes weak and porous bones, according to the National Osteoporosis Foundation. This condition primarily affects people age 50 and older, and women have a higher risk of osteoporosis as the body’s estrogen levels decrease. Fortunately, there are some steps you can take to reduce your osteoporosis risk and promote bone health.

Common Risk Factors

Certain health conditions and lifestyle factors can raise your risk of osteoporosis, such as:

  • Caucasian/white ethnicity
  • Petite body type
  • Family history
  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Smoking
  • Heavy drinking
  • A history of broken bones
  • Certain diseases, like rheumatoid arthritis
  • Long-term use of certain medications

Tell your doctor if you have one or more risk factors for osteoporosis.

Prevention

Preventing osteoporosis is really about improving bone health. Here are four things you can do to keep your bones strong and healthy:

Stay active with weight-bearing activities. Bone density peaks around age 30. After this point, the goal is to preserve as much bone mass and strength as possible, and weight-bearing exercise is one of the best ways to do this. Regularly participate in activities like walking, hiking, resistance training, and cycling. You can even wear wrist and ankle weights while walking around your house for a bone-building boost.

Consume bone-healthy foods. Make sure your diet includes vitamin D, calcium, potassium, and magnesium (found in foods like leafy greens, whole grains, beans, and fish).

Avoid vices. If you smoke, quit. If you drink alcohol, do so in moderation. Some research indicates excessive sugar consumption is linked with osteoporosis, too, so cut back on the sweet stuff.

If you have chronic pain that makes exercise or movement difficult, seek treatment. The less you move, the weaker your muscles and bones become. Physical inactivity can even make your pain worse. 

Ready to Get Moving Again?

Osteoporosis can make daily life more challenging, but there are ways to prevent it and manage it. If you need help addressing your pain, contact Center for Pain Management today to schedule an appointment: (317) 706-7246.

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